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Plants and Trees with Yellow Flowers for Sale

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Plants and Trees with Yellow Flowers – Buying & Growing Guide

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by Mary Van Keuren | Gardener (30+ Years Experience) – last update on December 2, 2021

Imagine your landscaping made suddenly grander with a burst of yellow in spring or summer. Trees with yellow flowers can add color and texture to your garden with multi-season interest. Explore our favorite trees with yellow flowers to find the one best for your home.

Types of Trees With Yellow Flowers

Type  Growing Zones Mature Height Sun Features
Tulip Poplar, Liriodendron tulipifera 4-9 60-80 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Deciduous tree with pyramid shape; yellow-orange 3 inch flowers; deer resistant
Yellow Trumpet Tree, Tabebuia caraiba 4-11 (patio); 10-11 (outdoors) 15-25 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Bright yellow blooms in spring; attractive to pollinators; semi-evergreen
Golden Raintree, Koelreuteria paniculata 5-9 30-40 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day A cluster of yellow flowers in midsummer followed by lantern-like seed capsules
Sunny Knock Out® Rose Tree, Rosa ‘Radsunny’ 5-10 3-4 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Abundant clusters of fragrant yellow 3 inch flowers; disease resistant; easy to grow
Ylang Ylang Tree, Cananga odorata 4-8 (patio), 9-11 (outdoors) 40-60 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Vivid, fragrant yellow flowers; blooms all year; low-maintenance
Cassia Tree, Cassia surattensis 9-11 10-12 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Bright yellow flowers in spring and fall; pollinator magnet; salt tolerant
Magnolia ‘Butterflies’ Tree, M. acuminata x M. denudata 4-9 15-20 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Vibrant canary-yellow flowers in spring; deciduous, pyramid-shaped tree or shrub
Julia Child Rose Tree, Rosa floribunda ‘Julia Child’ 4-9 3-6 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Fragrant floribunda double blooms, 4 inches across; disease resistant; good container plant
Virginian Witch Hazel, Hamamelis virginiana 3-8 15-20 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Deciduous tree or shrub; fragrant yellow flowers in fall; low maintenance
Palo Brea, Parkinsonia praecox 9-11 20-25 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Year-round interest with brilliant yellow flowers in spring; long-lived, drought-resistant

How to Plant and Care for Yellow Flowering Trees

Directions for planting and caring for your yellow flowering tree may vary depending on which tree you choose. In general, prepare your nursery-grown sapling by unpotting it and teasing out any roots encircling the root ball, as they can girdle and kill the tree slowly. 

Choose a spot for your tree where the soil drains well and gets the correct amount of sun for its species. Dig a hole that’s a little deeper than the root ball and twice as wide. Throw a few handfuls of well-rotted manure or compost in the bottom of the hole, and place the sapling in so that it is at the same level as it was in its pot. Fill in around it with fertile soil, tamping down as you go. Water thoroughly when done.

Your newly planted tree will benefit from regular watering every day or so for the first few weeks after it’s planted. Once you see new growth, you can scale back. For most trees, except the drought-resistant Palo Brea, you want to give them about an inch of supplemental watering if they are not getting that much from rain.

Most trees benefit from the application of a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in spring and early summer. Do not fertilize after mid-July, your tree is starting to prepare for winter and isn’t growing as much. Prune your tree to remove broken and diseased branches or any that are crossing and rubbing against each other.