Flowers That Start With ‘S’ for Sale

From sunflowers to snowflakes, there are many attractive and colorful flowers that start with the letter “S.” Explore our options to begin sprucing up your garden.

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Flowers That Start With ‘S’ for Sale

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Types of Flowers That Start With an ‘S’

Type  Growing Zones Mature Height Sun Features
Sunflower, Helianthus 2-11 Up to 12 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Range from dwarf to giant; flowers are pale yellow through bright red; most are annuals
Snowdrop, Galanthus nivalis 3-8 6-10 inches Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct light a day Bulbous perennial; small white flowers in late winter/early spring; multiplies readily
Snapdragon; Antirrhinum majus 5-10 4-36 inches Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Short-lived perennials or annuals; fragrant flowers in multiple colors; long bloom time
Spider Flower; Cleome hassleriana  2-11 3-6 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Fast-growing annual; airy flowers in a range of colors; self-sows readily; pest-free
Sweet Pea, Lathyrus odoratus 2-11 Up to 8 feet Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct light a day Bushy or climbing annual; fragrant flowers bloom all summer in a range of colors
Sweet William, Dianthus barbatus 3-9 1-2 feet Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct light a day Biennial or short-lived perennial; clustered flowers; reseeds freely; good container plant
Sword Lily, Gladiolus 5-11 2-6 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Eye-catching flowers in a variety of colors; sword-shaped leaves; grow from corms
Shooting Stars, Dodecatheon meadia 4-8 1-2 feet Full sun to full shade; 6 hours of direct light a day or less Perennial; white or pink flowers bloom in late spring; plant dies back in summer
Sneezeweed, Helenium 3-8 3-5 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Perennial; flowers in early fall; daisy-like flowers in a range of hot colors; pollinator magnets
Spring Snowflake, Leucojum sp. 3-9 8-24 inches Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct light a day White flowers with green spots on petals in spring; goes dormant in summer; bulbous perennial

How to Plant Flowers

If you are planting from seed, follow the package directions for the best time and place for your future flowers. For nursery plants, unpot the young plant and tease out any encircling roots, which can kill the plant if left alone. 

Dig a hole that’s a little deeper than the root ball and twice as wide. Throw in a few handfuls of well-rotted manure or compost and place the plant in the hole so it’s at the same level it was in the pot. Fill in around the root ball with soil enriched with compost or manure. Tamp down the soil and water thoroughly.

For the first few weeks after planting water every day or so unless you get rain. Once it is established and growing, you can cut back on watering to about one inch of water a week, either from rain or supplemental watering. Water the root zone rather than leaves if you’re using a hose, as wet leaves can leave a plant susceptible to fungal diseases.

If planted in fertile soil, it should not need fertilizer in its first year. If you want to give it a boost, apply a slow-release, all-purpose fertilizer according to the package directions. Water it well. Avoid fertilizer after mid-July as the plant is starting to prepare for winter and doesn’t need new growth.