Flowers That Start With ‘P’ for Sale

You might be surprised by how many flowers begin with the letter “P.” Planting a garden with this as your theme will give you a mass of color and texture pleasing to the eye and cleverly done. Explore the different types of flowers that start with a “P” and plan your garden.

Select where you are located in the dropdown or select your state on the map.
Do You Know Your Growing Zone? i
Growing zones help determine if a particular plant is likely to grow well in a location. It identifies the average annual minimum winter temperatures across the U.S. provided as a map by the USDA.
Price
$0 Lowest
$0 Highest

Flowers That Start With ‘P’ for Sale

1 Results

Types of Flowers That Start With a ‘P’

Type  Growing Zones Mature Height Sun Features
Peruvian Lily; Alstroemeria 6-10 2-3 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Tuberous perennial with dark green leaves and colorful, long-lasting flowers
Phlox, Phlox paniculata 3-9 2-4 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Masses of white, pink, or purple long-lasting flowers; attract pollinators; most varieties are perennial
Primrose; Primula 3-8 5-8 inches Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Brightly colored two inch flowers; bloom in spring; short-lived perennial
Pansy, Viola 4-10 6-12 inches Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Perennial; fragrant blooms in spring; excellent for edging and containers
Petunia, Petunia 2-11 6-12 inches Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Fast grower; annual below zone 11; prolific bloomer from spring through fall; excellent container plant
Passionflower, Passiflora 6-11 Up to 30 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Can be bushes or climbers; most varieties need Zone 8 or warmer; exotic multicolored blooms 
Peony, Paeonia 3-9 2-3 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Stunning fragrant flowers in early summer; excellent cut flowers; good border plants
Pineapple Lily, Eucomis 6-10 2-3 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours a day Bulbous perennial; racemes of white or pink flowers on tall stalks; deer resistant
Pincushion Flower, Leucospermum 9-11 4-12 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours a day Evergreen shrub with large six inch flower clusters; drought-resistant; likes acidic soil
Plumbago, Plumbago 8-11 4-10 feet Full to partial sun: at least 4 hours of direct light a day Vining or shrubby plants with profuse trumpet-shaped flowers; great for borders and against walls

How to Plant Flowers

Site your plant carefully so it receives the amount of daylight most conducive for its growth. Most flowering plants appreciate fertile, well-draining soil in a place where water does not puddle. 

To plant a nursery-grown specimen, unpot your plant and tease out any encircling roots, which can girdle your plant and eventually kill it. Dig a hot that’s a little deeper than the root ball and twice as wide. Throw in a shovelful of well-rotted compost or manure and place your plant in the hole. Fill in around it with loose, friable soil that’s mixed with compost. Tamp down carefully and water thoroughly.

When newly planted, most flowers appreciate water every day or so, unless you get rain. Once they are established and growing, you can cut back on the water. One inch of water a week is appropriate for most flowers, either from rain or supplemental watering. When watering with a hose, direct the water to the root zone rather than the leaves to avoid fungal diseases.

Give your plants a boost with regular applications of all-purpose, balanced fertilizer, applying it as the package directions indicate. Ease back on fertilizing by July, when the plant starts preparing itself for the coming winter.