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Trees with Purple Flowers for Sale - Buying & Growing Guide

Purple is the color of royalty, and a tree with purple flowers brings a regal elegance to your home’s landscaping. There is a broad range of trees featuring purple flowers. Explore our selection below to find the one that will be the centerpiece of your garden.

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Trees with Purple Flowers for Sale - Buying & Growing Guide

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Types of Trees With Purple Flowers

Type  Growing Zones Mature Height Sun Features
Royal Empress Tree, Paulownia elongata 7-11 40-50 feet Full to partial sun: 4 hours or more of direct light a day Fragrant light purple blossoms, grows quickly, low-maintenance, and drought tolerant
Jacaranda Tree, Jacaranda mimosifolia 9-11 25-50 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Spectacular lavender-blue trumpet-shaped flowers, decorative seed pods, and disease-free
Muskogee Crape Myrtle Tree; Lagerstroemia indica x fauriei ‘Muskogee’ 6-9 15-20 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Lavender blooms last up to 6 months, fast growing, and mildew-resistant
Korean Lilac Tree, Syringa meyeri ‘Palibin’ 4-8 4-7 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Deciduous shrub or tree with fragrant blooms in spring, disease-free, and drought tolerant
Lavender Rose of Sharon Althea Tree, Hibiscus syriacus ‘Ardens’ 5-8 6-10 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Purple-blue double blooms in late summer, drought tolerant, and thrives in poor soil
Royal Purple Smoke Tree, Cotinus coggygria 5-9 10-15 feet Full to partial sun: 4 hours or more of direct light a day Attractive maroon foliage, smoke-like pink-purple blooms in spring, deer toleran, and; drought tolerant
Vitex Chaste Tree, Vitex agnus castus 5-9 15-25 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Fragrant lavender blooms last across seasons, attracts pollinators, salt tolerant
Bloomerang Lilac Tree, Syringa ‘SMSJBP7’ PP26549 3-7 5-6 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Blooms twice, once in mid-late spring andonce in the fall, no insect or disease challenges
Twilight Crape Myrtle, Lagerstroemia indica ‘Twilight’ 7-9 20-25 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct light a day Royal purple, fragrant, flowers from June-frost, interesting bark patterns, and very hardy
Miss Kim Lilac Tree, Syringa patula ‘Miss Kim’ 3-8 4-8 feet Full to partial sun: 4 hours or more of direct light a day Fragrant, lavender flowers in late spring, low maintenance, and attracts pollinators

How to Plant and Care for Purple Flowering Trees

Always read the care tag on any sapling you purchase and follow the directions that the growers have outlined. In general, it’s not hard to plant and care for purple flowering trees.

Unpot your sapling and tease out any encircling roots so they do not girdle the tree and eventually kill it. Dig a hole that’s a little deeper than the root ball and twice as wide. Dig a shovel-full of well-rotted compost or manure into the soil at the bottom of the hole and place your tree on top, so it is roughly the same level as it was in the pot.

Fill in around the tree with topsoil that’s had some compost mixed in. Tamp down gently to eliminate air pockets. Water thoroughly when you’re done, and mulch with organic material such as bark chips.

For the first few weeks, until you see new growth start to appear, water your sapling every day or so. After that, you can scale back. Most trees like about an inch of water a week and if you aren’t getting that from rain, consider supplemental watering.

Fertilize your tree with a balanced, slow-release product designed for landscape trees in early spring. Follow package directions for subsequent applications, tapering off in July so the plant can prepare for slow growth in winter.

When your tree is young, you can prune it for shape. Also, cut out any broken or diseased limbs, as well as any that are rubbing against each other. Once the tree has reached its mature size, there should be less need for pruning.