Plants and Trees with Orange Flowers for Sale - Buying & Growing Guide

If you’re looking for plants that will add a colorful pop to your garden, look no further than orange flowers. Orange blooms energize your garden; they will have passers-by turning for a second look at your bright landscape. Explore different varieties of orange flowers to see how they can transform your garden.

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Growing zones help determine if a particular plant is likely to grow well in a location. It identifies the average annual minimum winter temperatures across the U.S. provided as a map by the USDA.
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Types of Orange Flowers

Type  Growing Zones Mature Height Sun Features
Flowering Maple; Abutilon hybrida ‘Lucky lantern Tangerine’ 8-10 10-12 inches Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct sun a day Dwarf semi-evergreen shrub; long-lasting orange flowers; drought-resistant
Sunset Hyssop, Agastache rupestris 5-9 1-3 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct sun a day Fragrant tubular salmon-orange flowers; blooms all summer; deadheading encourages blooms
Mountain Aloe, Aloe marlothii 8-10 8-10 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct sun a day Single-stemmed evergreen succulent; racemes with tubular orange blooms; pollinator magnet 
Angel’s Trumpet, Brugmansia versicolor 9-11 10-15 feet Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct sun a day Large shrub or small tree; blooms summer-fall; fragrant flowers start out white and turn orange
Pot Marigold, Calendula officinalis 2-11 1-2 feet Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct sun a day Cheerful orange flowers are edible; very cold hardy; good plant for borders or containers
Trumpet Vine, Campsis radicans 5-9 20-40 feet Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct sun a day Self-clinging woody vine; 3 inch trumpet-like orange flowers; easy to grow; needs trellis or fence
Tickseed, Coreopsis ‘Mango Punch’ 9-10 8-12 inches Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct sun a day Orange flowers with red edges; blooms summer-fall; low maintenance; thrives in poor soil
Orange Cosmos, Cosmos sulphureus ‘Cosmic Orange’ 2-11 1-2 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct sun a day Hardy annual; 2 inch vibrant orange flowers; blooms from early summer-fall
David Howard Dahlia, Dahlia ‘David Howard’ 8-11 2-3 feet Full sun: 6 or more hours of direct sun a day Award-winning 4 inch flowers bloom from July-frost; excellent cut flowers; deadheading encourages blooms
Coneflower, Echinacea ‘Sombrero Adobe Orange’ 4-9 1-2 feet Full to partial sun: 4 or more hours of direct sun a day Intense orange 3 inch flowers; long bloom season; flowers draw birds; drought resistant

How to Plant and Grow Flowers

Every flowering plant will have unique needs, so choose a site for your plant that receives the appropriate amount of sunlight. Soil should be fertile and should drain well, as few plants like to stand in puddles. 

When transplanting seedlings or nursery plants, unpot your plant and tease out any encircling roots. Dig a hole that is a little deeper than the root ball and twice as wide. Throw in a few handfuls of well-rotted compost or manure and place the plant in the middle of the hole. Fill in around it with soil that has been amended with compost.

Newly-planted flowers should be watered every day or so. Once they are established, you can cut back on watering. In general, you’ll want to water when the soil dries out an inch or so below the surface. Mulching with an organic material such as bark chips can minimize your need for watering.

Give your plant a boost during the growing season with an all-purpose, balanced fertilizer, applying it according to the package directions. With many flowers, you can encourage reblooming by deadheading any spent blooms.