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Condo Avocado Tree for Sale - Buying & Growing Guide

  • CondoAvocadoTree
  • avocadohouseplant
  • CondoAvocadoTree
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Persea americana

The well-named Condo Avocado Tree is exactly what you'd expect it to be: a great option for a small, productive tree to keep in your condo, apartment, or home. Although it can be grown outdoors in the southernmost regions of the U.S., it excels as a container-grown planting. It is an attractive addition to any interior design with glossy dark green leaves and an attractive silhouette. But, it's more than just a pretty tree. Once it reaches about three feet in height, you should be able to harvest tasty avocados to be eaten fresh or used in cooking. These avocados are better, with more flavor than any you might purchase in the grocery store. This tree is also an easy keeper and requires little extra care or fussing other than moving it outdoors when the temperature warms up in spring. Here are a few more reasons to grab one or more of these trees while you can:

  • They are self-pollinating; so, you will be able to harvest the fruit with only one tree.
  • It only needs light pruning.
  • Can be container-grown throughout the continental U.S.
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Plant Care

Sunlight

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The Condo Avocado Tree does best in partial to full sun—four or more hours of direct sunlight a day.

Watering

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Water weekly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings, and mist the leaves of indoor plants.

Fertilizing

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After its first year, fertilize your avocado tree with a balanced, slow-release product in spring and fall.

Planting and Care

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by Mary Van Keuren | Gardener (30+ Years Experience) – last update on September 20, 2022

Planting instructions

If planting your avocado outdoors, site it where it will get at least four hours of direct sunlight a day, in soil that drains well. Unpot your sapling and tease out any encircling roots, which can girdle the tree and slowly kill it. Dig a hole that’s as deep as the root ball and twice as wide. Place the tree in the hole, spreading out the roots. Holding the tree upright and steady, fill in around the roots with topsoil and tamp down as you go to eliminate air pockets. Water thoroughly. Apply a two to three-inch layer of organic mulch such as bark chips around the root zone to conserve moisture and hinder weed growth but keep it from touching the trunk to avoid problems with rot.

Watering and nutrients

Water your Condo Avocado Tree weekly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. If it’s outside and you are experiencing extreme heat or drought, you may need to water more frequently. If your tree is indoors, mist the leaves daily and place the container in a tray of rocks and water to increase humidity. Avoid fertilizing your tree for the first year. After that, fertilize it with a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in spring and fall.

Pollination

The Condo Avocado is self-fertile, meaning that its flowers can pollinate themselves and thus you can harvest fruit with only one tree. However, the trees set fruit at a higher rate when you have more than one cultivar. One good option is to have another tree—the Cold Hardy Avocado is a good choice—nearby so that they can cross-pollinate.

Pruning

Trim out any dead, diseased or damaged limbs on your Condo Avocado Tree whenever you see them. In the spring, you can lightly prune back a young tree to shape it. However, the tree should not need a heavy annual pruning.

Pests, diseases and animals

Pests that may bother an avocado tree include the avocado brown mite and avocado thrips. If you’re growing your plant indoors, you may also see common insects that are found on houseplants such as aphids and spider mites. A healthy tree can fend off infestation. Wiping down the leaves with a damp cloth will also help eliminate insect pests. Diseases of the avocado include anthracnose, fusarium and sooty mold. These are unlikely to occur in a plant that is grown indoors. Always water your plant at the base of the trunk and keep it in a spot that has good air circulation to avoid fungal diseases.

Harvesting

The color of your avocado fruit may darken slightly when they are ripe, but the fruit will not begin to soften until after it is picked. Avoid pulling them off the tree, which can damage the branches, but use clippers or pruners to cut the stem. Never harvest right after a rain—it’s best to do so on a dry day. The fruits should soften and become ripe 3 to 8 days after picking, or longer if they are kept in the refrigerator.

Achieving maximum results

Although the Condo Avocado Tree can be grown outdoors in parts of the southern U.S., most American gardeners will want to grow this petite tree in a container that can be brought inside during the colder months. Doing so isn’t difficult. Choose a pot for your tree that is twice as big as the root ball. Use a good quality potting mix and follow our directions above for planting. Note that container-grown plants need more frequent watering than those in the ground and be diligent about fertilizing your tree regularly.

FAQs

Where can I grow a Condo Avocado Tree?

Condo Avocado can be grown outdoors in USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11. That includes most of Florida, southern Texas, Louisiana and much of coastal California. For other gardeners, this easy keeper can be grown in a container that is brought indoors whenever the temperatures dip near 30 degrees Fahrenheit.

How big will my Condo Avocado get?

A mature Condo Avocado may reach a height of 8 to 10 feet with a width of about 5 feet. If you are growing your tree in a container, it may mature at a shorter height than this because the roots are constrained by the size of the pot. If you have a container-grown avocado tree that you'd like to see grow taller, consider repotting it with fresh soil in a slightly larger pot.

Why isn't my avocado tree producing fruit?

After planting, give your tree a year or so to reach a height of at least three feet. If grown indoors, ensure that your tree is getting as much sunlight as possible—placing it in a sunny south-facing window is a good idea. If your tree is giving you some fruit, but you'd like more, consider purchasing another avocado tree to help boost the pollination rate.

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Mature height
8-10 ft.
Mature width
5 ft.
Sunlight requirement
Full-Partial
Growth rate
Moderate
Botanical name
Persea americana
Shipping exclusions
AZ
Grows Well In Zones
4-11 patio / 9-11 outdoors
map
Growing Zones: 4-11 patio / 9-11 outdoors i Growing zones help determine if a particular plant is likely to grow well in a location. It identifies the average annual minimum winter temperatures across the U.S. provided as a map by the USDA.
(hardy down to -10°F)

Condo Avocado Tree

Persea americana
  • Ships in 1-2 days
  • 1-Year Warranty Eligible
  • Pots or accessories are not included unless specified in the product options.
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