10 Types of Black Flowers with Pictures

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by Max - last update on July 8, 2020, 8:01 am
Types of Black Flowers

Black flowers create grounding effects and moody emotions in the garden. They add great depth by playing contrast to the green leaves of plants, and those yellow, or orange flowers.

If you're looking for some plants with the mysterious black colors for a dreamy garden of your own, here are 10 types of black flowers. Keep in mind that they are not totally black, but have a mixed shade of dark colors like purple, maroon, red, or blue.

10 Types of Black Flowers

1. Black Columbine

Black Columbine

Common Name: Black Barlow

Scientific Name: Aquilegia vulgaris var. Stellata ‘Black Barlow’

Mature Size: Up to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Well-draining, rich

Columbines are short-lived perennial plants that grow in clumps. They have fern-like gray-green foliage, out from that tall stems rise in late spring or early summer bearing fully-double puffed up flowers. This variety of columbine produces blooms in a rich and dark purple shade that looks black in many lights. It was cultivated as part of the 'Barlow’ series, which are known for being spurless. These columbines are specifically bred for the production of cut flowers, as they make excellent bouquets and have a good vase life of around two weeks.

These plants grow easily with little care, as long as they have well-draining soil with medium moisture and access to some sun. They can not tolerate waterlogged or poorly draining soils. These plants can grow in full sun or partially shaded positions, though they prefer afternoon shade where possible. In spite of their relatively short-lives, these plants are very rewarding to grow as they self-seed easily and so produce new plants each year. You can expect the plant to produce up to five flowers in its first year, and up to ten in its second year. Deadhead flowers once they have faded to encourage more bloom production.


2. Black Hollyhock

Black Hollyhock

Common Name: Black Knight

Scientific Name: Alcea Rosea ‘Black Knight’

Mature Size: Up to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

Light: Full sun

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Well-draining

Hollyhocks are perennial plants with vigorous, growing habits. They work best when allowed to grow against a fence or wall for support, and their average height of five to six feet lends them well to use on the back row of a border. This hollyhock variety is particularly hardy and produces tall spikes that are sturdy enough to hold the weight of their many funnel-shaped flowers. These flowers are single, typically measure around four inches across, and cover the length of the spike. They are a deep shade of purple that is so dark that it looks more black than purple. The throats of the flowers are yellow, which offers a nice contrast.

These plants are easy to grow and are enormously attractive to bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. They will adapt to most types of soil, though prefer well-draining soil, and will not survive in waterlogged soils through winter. This cultivar belongs to a group of hollyhocks called the ‘Spotlight Series,’ which are noted for being full perennials, not biennials like some hollyhocks.


3. Black Sword Lily

Black Sword Lily

Common Name: Black Sword

Scientific Name: Gladiolus ‘Black Surprise’

Mature Size: Up to 4 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-11

Light: Full sun

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Well-draining

Sword lilies grow from corms that are like bulbs, producing tall spikes of flowers that rise high above mounds of sword-like leaves below. They will bloom between ten and twelve weeks after planting, so for a long flower show, you can plant them periodically through spring, and watch as they bloom in order. Each spike is adorned with around twelve flowers, which open up gradually from the bottom upwards. Each spike will typically be in bloom for around two weeks.

This variety of sword lily produces theatrical looking flowers in a deep, dark red, with a soft texture. They are so darkly colored that they look as though they could have been made with black velvet. They make dramatic cut flower bouquets and also work well when planted in containers or beds and borders. They need full sun to thrive and will adapt to most soil types except for clay soil. They need to be kept in moist soil until after they have flowered, at that time you can reduce watering.


4. Black Bearded Iris

Black Bearded Iris

Common Name: Men In Black

Scientific Name: Iris germanica ‘Men In Black’

Mature Size: Up to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Well-draining, rich

Bearded irises are perennial plants that grow from creeping rhizomes. As the rhizomes spread underground, the iris clump will grow larger over time. The plant produces sword-shaped leaves that grow in mounds. This variety of bearded iris is an impressive bloomer and will flower over a long period of time. It will usually bloom in late spring or early summer, but this will be dependent on the weather.

The unusual flowers have purple-black petals that are ruffled around the edges and are contrasted by a dark yellow beard. They appear on tall and sturdy spikes that are held high above the foliage. They can grow in full sun or partial shade, though they perform best in full sun. They need well-draining soil to allow water to flow freely; otherwise, the rhizomes may rot, and they have good resistance to drought once they are established. They work well when planted in borders or in containers.


5. Black Rose

Black Rose

Common Name: Black Baccara Hybrid Tea Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa ‘Black Baccara’

Mature Size: Up to 6 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

Light: Full sun

Water: Maintain moist soil

Soil: Well-draining

Hybrid tea roses were created by crossing the tea rose with the hybrid perpetual rose. They are a group of roses that are the oldest among the modern garden roses. They are deciduous shrubs with an open habit that produce one full and large flower at the end of each stem. These types of roses will bloom sporadically throughout the growing season and are known as the most popular type of roses in the world thanks to their attractive fragrance, easy growth, and stunning blooms.

This cultivar of hybrid tea rose produces very dramatic flowers, in darkest red that appears to be almost black. Each bloom has 45 petals, which gives it a very full shape. Flowers typically measure around three inches across and will bloom on and off from spring right through to fall. The texture of the flowers is soft and velvety, which contrasts with the glossy leaves. They make nice cut flowers and work well when planted as specimen plants or in hedges. They need full sun and well-draining soil with consistent moisture.


6. Black Dahlia

Black Dahlia

Common Name: Karma Choc

Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Karma Choc’

Mature Size: Up to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-11

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Maintain moist soil

Soil: Well-draining

Dahlias are perennial flowering plants that thrive in warmer weather. When grown in USDA hardiness zones 8-11, they can be kept in the ground year-round, but these plants are also commonly grown in zones 3-7, though they will need more care. In these colder zones, you will need to dig the tubers after the plant has faded, but before the first frost. Set them in a box wrapped in moist paper or covered with moist sand, and leave them to overwinter in a dark spot that is kept at between 45 and 50º F. They can be replanted the following spring after the final frost. If you don’t want to dig up the tubers, you could instead treat them as annuals, as the frost will kill them, and they won’t grow back the following year.

This cultivar of dahlia produces large, fully double flowers that can grow to be up to six inches wide. They are such a dark shade of brown it is hard to believe that they are not truly black. Flowers grow on top of tall stems that do not ordinarily need support, usually blooming in July and remaining right through to the first frost.

Deadheading spent blooms will encourage additional blooming, or you could cut the stems to make cut flower bouquets. This is a win-win situation, as dahlias produce more flowers the more that they get cut. Once cut, the flowers will survive in a vase for around two weeks. These plants grow well in full sun or partial shade, and their soil should not be allowed to dry out during the growing seasons, as this can affect bloom production.


7. Black Persian Lily

Black Persian Lily

Common Name: Adiyaman

Scientific Name: Fritillaria persica ‘Adiyaman’

Mature Size: Up to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Light: Full sun

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Well-draining, sandy

Persian lilies are perennial plants that grow from bulbs. They produce tall stems that are covered in dangling bell-like flowers, with around thirty blooms on each sturdy stem. Beneath the flowering stems, sit sword-shaped foliage in a gray-green shade. This cultivar produces flowers that are a rich purple shade, so dark and intense that they look black. This plant has received the Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society and offers excellent performance. If kept in ideal conditions, it will reappear year on year. It thrives in full sun and must be grown in a very well-draining soil.


8. Black Peony

Black Peony

Common Name: Chocolate Soldier

Scientific Name: Paeonia ‘Chocolate Soldier’

Mature Size: Up to 3 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Fertile, well-draining

Peonies are perennial shrubs that are long-lived plants, sometimes lasting over five decades. This cultivar of peony is one of the darkest hybrids available, with dark brown single flowers that appear black in some light. It is a heavy bloomer, flowering in abundance in late spring or early summer. Each flower arrives on a tall and sturdy stem and typically lasts for around eight days, though if planted at intervals, you will ensure a longer floral display.

This peony has a dense and bushy habit that forms mounds of dark green foliage. The leaves will then develop to warmer autumnal colors in the fall. These plants love full sun or partial shade, and in hotter climates will benefit from afternoon shade. They should be grown in a sheltered position away from strong winds.


9. Black Calla Lily

Black Calla Lily

Common Name: Odessa

Scientific Name: Zantedeschia ‘Odessa’

Mature Size: Up to 2 feet tall

USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-10

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Maintain moist soil

Soil: Well-draining

Calla lilies are grown from bulbs and are native to South Africa. They are most typically seen with white flowers, but this stunning cultivar produces rich dark blooms in plum-black. The flowers are not technically flowers but are spathes that are commonly considered to be the blooms of the plant. They are an open trumpet shape, growing from tall and strong stems. They work well in borders, containers, and as cut flowers. Calla lilies will thrive in full sun or partial shade and need a consistently moist but well-draining soil. All parts of the plant are toxic, so these should be kept away from pets and children.


10. Black Tulip

Black Tulip

Common Name: Queen of Night

Scientific Name: Tulipa ‘Queen of Night’

Mature Size: Up to 3 feet

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Light: Full sun

Water: Average water needs

Soil: Fertile, well-draining

This black tulip belongs to a group of tulips known as ‘single late tulips,’ that bloom at the end of spring. The flowers are cup-shaped, with velvet-textured petals in a shade of dark burgundy that appears black in some lighting. Blooms appear on sturdy stems that hold steady even in wind and rain. These plants should be planted in the fall, and thrive in full sun positions, in well-draining and fertile soil.


10 Types of Black Flowers with Pictures

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