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Berry Bushes for Sale - Buying & Growing Guide

Do You Know Your Growing Zone? i Growing zones help determine if a particular plant is likely to grow well in a location. It identifies the average annual minimum winter temperatures across the U.S. provided as a map by the USDA.
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Berry Bushes – Buying & Growing Guide

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by Mary Van Keuren | Gardener (30+ Years Experience) – last update on December 2, 2021

Whether you are growing a common berry, such as blueberries or raspberries, or something more exotic, like a magnolia vine, there is no substitute for a fresh berry picked from the bush and popped into your mouth. Many berries are too fragile to ever make their way to the grocery store. Explore the different types of berry bushes so you can enjoy the rare treats they offer come harvest.

Types of Berry Bushes

Type  Growing Zones Mature Height Harvest Season Sun Features
Blueberry Bushes, Vaccinium 3-10 1-8 feet June-July Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Deciduous shrubs; colorful foliage; plant more than one for best crop
Raspberry bushes, Rubus  4-10 3-8 feet June-September Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Everbearing types have two harvests a year; yield reduced in partial shade; need trellising
Strawberry bushes, Fragaria 4-9 6-12 inches April-August Full sun: 6 or more hours a day of direct light May fruit in the first year; reproduce by runners; can be container-grown
Blackberry Bushes, Rubus  4-9 3-6 inches July-September Full sun: 6 or more hours a day of direct light Some varieties need trellising; best planted in spring; require pruning
Grapes, Vitis 5-10 Up to 12 feet August-September Full sun: 6 or more hours a day of direct light Vines require sturdy support and well-drained soil; some fruit in the first year 
Chokeberry, Aronia 3-8 5-10 feet September Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Semi-evergreen shrubs; profuse flowers; excellent food source for birds; deer resistant
Chokecherry, Prunus virginiana 3-8 10-30 feet June-August Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Small tree or large shrub; leaves attractive in fall; berries are edible 
Cranberry Bushes; Viburnum trilobum 2-7 5-10 feet September Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Flowering shrub; showy white nectar-rich flowers; easy to grow
Elderberry, Sambucus 3-8 10-12 feet August Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Deciduous shrub or small tree; Great for borders or hedges; deer resistant
Goji Berry Bush (Chinese Box Thorn), Lycium barbarum 5-9 6-10 feet September Full sun: 6 or more hours a day of direct light Deciduous shrub; purple flowers and red edible berries; may be trellised
Honeyberry, Lonicera caerulea 2-8 3-6 feet May-June Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Fragrant white flowers followed by one inch long blue edible berries; deciduous shrub
Lingonberry; Vaccinium vitis-idaea 2-7 12-18 inches August-October Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Pink flowers lead to two crops of tart, edible berries; good groundcover
Magnolia Vine (Five Flavor Fruit), Schisandra chinensis 4-8 15-30 feet August-September Full sun: At least 6 hours of direct light a day Easy to grow vine; unique edible berries; needs trellising; fragrant flowers in spring 
Miracle Berry Bush; Synsepalum Dulcificum 4-11 (containers); 9-11 outside 2-3 feet August-October, or year-round if indoors Full to partial sun: At least 4 hours of direct light a day Eating berries makes sour food taste sweet; prefers acidic soil; two berry crops a year
Pineberry, Fragaria x ananassa 5-8 8-12 inches Bear throughout the growing season Full sun: At least 6 hours of direct light a day Smaller than strawberries, tastes like a pineapple; white berries with red seeds

How to Plant Berry Bushes

Site your berry bush carefully, so it will receive the right amount of sun, in fertile, well-draining soil amended with well-rotted compost or manure. Unpot your berry plant and tease out roots encircling the root ball. They can girdle and kill the bush slowly. 

Dig a hole that’s a little deeper than the root ball and twice as wide. Mix a few handfuls of compost or manure in the bottom of the hole and place the plant in the hole so that it’s at the same level it was in the pot. Fill in around it with soil, tamping down as you go. Build a low berm a foot or so out from the trunk of the tree so the water stays in the root zone and water well.

For the first few weeks, water your berry bush daily until you start to see new growth. Then cut back to about an inch of water a week, either through rain or supplemental watering. If watering with a hose, aim at the roots rather than the leaves to avoid fungal infections.

Most berry bushes will benefit from feedings with an all-purpose, slow-release fertilizer early in the season. The exceptions are acid-loving plants like blueberries and miracle berries. For them, use a fertilizer formulated for acid-lovers. 

When to Harvest Berries

Each berry bush has its own harvest time, whether early in the season or later in the fall. Some, like everlasting raspberries, have two harvests a year, a light harvest in early to mid-summer, then a fuller harvest in September or October, depending on how far north you are. 

Many berries are a treat for birds as well as humans. If you are losing out to your feathered friends, you may want to invest in bird netting placed over your berry bush as the berries are ripening. These can be awkward to work with, and you will want to check them regularly to ensure no birds get tangled in them but they can help save the harvest for your use.

Unlike some fruits, most berries won’t continue to ripen once picked, so you’ll need to time your harvest so that you’re picking the berries at the height of ripeness. If picking berries for your personal use, picking them manually is an enjoyable activity for a summer’s evening.