Low Light House Plants for Sale

Succulents are our favorite houseplants. That’s because they’re relatively easy to care for. But that ease of maintenance usually comes with one caveat. Many of the most popular succulents love to live in full sunlight, which many indoor settings cannot provide. Fortunately, there are several types of low-light succulents you can grow indoors with ease. All you need to do is know how to choose these shade-loving succulents from the rest. After that, you should take time to learn how best to care for a low-light succulent.

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Low Light House Plants for Sale

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Types of Low-Light Succulents

Type  Growing Zones Mature Height Sun Features
Zebra plant, Aphelandra squarrosa 11-12 12 to 24 inches Shade to part shade: 4 hours or less Bold leaves with white stripes.
Minima plant, Echeveria minima 9-11 2 to 3 inches Full sun to part shade: 4 to 6 hours Spiral of thick blue-green leaves.
Mistletoe cactus, Rhipsalis baccifera  9-10 4 to 6 feet Shade to part shade: 4 hours or less Develops a long, trailing habit with a fine texture.
Snake plant, Sansevieria trifasciata 10-11 4 to 6 feet Shade to part shade: 4 hours or less Upright leaves with elongated stripes.
Oxtongue plant, Gasteria 9-11 6 to 24 inches Full sun to part shade: 4 to 6 hours Speckled foliage is long and angular.
Flower dust plant, Kalanchoe pumila  9-11 8 to 12 inches Full sun to part shade: 4 to 6 hours Muted leaves with bold purple flowers.
Aloe plant, Aloe vera 8-11 12 to 24 inches Full sun to part shade: 4 to 6 hours Long, green leaves with spikes along the margins.
Flaming Katy, Kalanchoe blossfeldiana  8-10 12 to 20 inches Shade to part shade: 4 hours or less Surprisingly bright flowers compared to other succulents.

How to Care for Low-Light Succulents

Before you take any type of succulent home, you should know the care requirements. Succulents as a group have a few common maintenance needs. 

Most of the difficulty of caring for a succulent relates to water. Most succulents have specific water preferences. During spring and summer, for example, succulents need more water than usual. However, you should try not to allow water to land on the leaves. This can lead to mold and other issues. Good drainage is also a concern for succulents, so make sure the container you use has enough holes to allow water to escape. 

Giving your succulents enough sun can also be tough. Even if you have a low-light succulent, your plant will still need some amount of daily light. As you will notice as you search for a suitable variety, many low-light succulents still require a few hours of light. 

If getting enough sunlight is not possible in your home, you’ll need to find an alternative light source. To your benefit, there are many grow lights on the market that you can use to keep your plants alive in an otherwise dark room. 

Following that advice should be enough to keep your low-light succulents happy in your home. Still, there are a few other tips that will help you to further support your succulent’s growth. Try keeping the leaves as clean as possible and monitor pests as much as you can. Doing so will increase the odds that your succulent will thrive.