10 Spring Flowers That Are Easy to Grow

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by Max - last update on September 20, 2020, 1:28 am
Spring Flowers

Spring flowers are an indication that warmer weather is coming, and they are greatly anticipated by many gardeners throughout winter. Some of the best and easiest to grow spring flowers are listed here.

1. Daffodil

Daffodil

 

Scientific Name: Narcissus sp.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-11

Mature Size: Up to 2 feet tall

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘Bell Song’ Daffodil - Narcissus ‘Bell Song’, ‘Dutch Master’ Trumpet Daffodil - Narcissus ‘Dutch Master’, ‘Flower Record’ Large-Cupped Daffodil - Narcissus ‘Flower Record’

Daffodils are plants that grow from bulbs. They should be planted in the fall and will flower in late winter and early spring. Many people view the arrival of daffodils in the garden as being synonymous with the arrival of spring. These plants produce showy flowers that bloom atop stiff, upright stems. They typically have a central trumpet-shaped corona that is surrounded by six petals that fan out into a star shape. These flowers are almost always yellow or white, though the shades of yellow can vary from deep mustard to pale lemon. Some other cultivars now exist that are orange.

They are very easy to grow and require almost no care after planting the bulbs, as they will survive on the rainfall of winter and spring. They make excellent cut flowers and will reappear each year as long as the bulbs do not get disturbed. The blooming time of daffodils depends on the variety and the climate, but most will bloom around mid-spring.


2. Tulip

Tulip

 

Scientific Name: Tulipa sp.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Mature Size: Up to 3 feet tall

Light: Full sun

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘Arma’ Fringed Tulip - Tulipa ‘Arma’, ‘Blushing Beauty’ Single Late Tulip - Tulipa ‘Blushing Beauty’, ‘Blue Ribbon’ Triumph Tulip - Tulipa ‘Blue Ribbon’

Like daffodils, tulips are another sign that spring has arrived. These are the most popular type of flowers that grow from bulbs, and there are more than 3000 different varieties in existence, offering more choice in terms of color and flower style than almost any other plant. While most people imagine a cupped flower when they envisage tulips, there are actually a vast amount of different flower types available, with some fringed or double flowers that look more like peonies or dahlias than tulips.

These plants produce very showy flowers that bloom from erect stems, and will sometimes need to be staked under the weight of the large blooms. The type of tulip you have will determine at what point during spring it blooms. Single and double early bloomers will arrive in early spring, while triumph tulips will bloom in mid-season. For late-season blooming, choose fringed or parrot tulips. If you want a long season of tulips blooming in your garden, you can select a few bulbs from each variety and watch them bloom in succession. Tulips are loved because they are very low maintenance but very rewarding.


3. Spring Starflower

Spring Starflower

 

Scientific Name: Ipheion uniflorum

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

Mature Size: Up to 6 inches tall

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, average

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘Charlotte Bishop’ Spring Starflower - Ipheion uniflorum ‘Charlotte Bishop’, ‘White Star’ Spring Starflower - Ipheion uniflorum ‘White Star’, ‘Wisley Blue’ Spring Starflower - Ipheion uniflorum ‘Wisley Blue’

This is a small plant that grows from a bulb. It is native to South America but is now widely cultivated as an ornamental plant. It produces long and glossy grass-like foliage that can measure up to one foot in length. This plant is related to the onion and resides in the same allium family. When crushed, the foliage emits a scent similar to onions. Each plant produces one single flower on top of a tall stem that rises out above the foliage. The solitary flower has six petals spread out into a star shape, hence the common name of starflower. Flowers come in various shades of blue, purple, and white.

These plants bloom in early spring and then go dormant by late spring. Once they are well established, they will naturalize with ease and grow back year after year. These are delightful easy-care plants that look great in borders or when planted in large groups.


4. Common Hyacinth

Common Hyacinth

 

Scientific Name: Hyacinthus orientalis

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Mature Size: Up to 1 foot tall

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Maintain moist soil

Soil: Well-draining

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘Blue Festival’ Common Hyacinth - Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Blue Festival’, ‘Anna Marie’ Common Hyacinth - Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Anna Marie’, ‘Lady Derby’ Common Hyacinth - Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Lady Derby’

This is a bulbous plant that also goes by the common names of ‘Dutch hyacinth’ and ‘garden hyacinth.’ It produces broad, strap-shaped leaves that grow in clumps around the base of the central flowering stem. The stem produces a raceme of florets, with each stem having anywhere between two and 50 individual flowers. The flowers are most commonly purple or blue, but can also be found in shades of pink and white. They can bloom at any time in spring, and the flowers will last for up to three weeks.

The flowers are heavily scented and popular with pollinators. Most common hyacinths will only produce one flowering stem per bulb, but there are some cultivars that have been developed to produce as many as six flowering stems per bulb, resulting in a very showy floral display. These plants are easy to grow and work well in borders or in containers.


5. Spring Crocus

Spring Crocus

 

Scientific Name: Crocus vernus

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Mature Size: Up to 6 inches tall

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, average

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘Pickwick’ Spring Crocus - Crocus vernus ‘Pickwick’, ‘Remembrance’ Spring Crocus - Crocus vernus ‘Remembrance’, ‘Flower Record’ Spring Crocus - Crocus vernus ‘Flower Record’

Crocus is a type of perennial flowering plant, of which there are around 90 different species. The spring crocus produces larger flowers than any other type of crocus and blooms in early spring. These plants grow from corms that should be planted in the ground the previous fall, much like bulbs. The plant will return each spring and will bloom a little earlier with every year that passes.

Most types of spring crocus produce blue or purple flowers with yellow centers. They are cup-shaped and appear on small plants that measure no more than six inches tall. They work well in flower beds or planted in front of shrubs. They also look excellent planted in a long row down the side of a walkway. These are very low maintenance plants that will naturalize easily.


6. Grecian Windflower

Grecian Windflower

 

Scientific Name: Anemone blanda

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Mature Size: Up to 9 inches

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Maintain moist soil

Soil: Well-draining

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘White Splendor’ Grecian Windflower - Anemone blanda ‘White Splendor’, ‘Blue Star’ Grecian Windflower - Anemone blanda ‘Blue Star’, ‘Pink Charmer’ Grecian Windflower - Anemone blanda ‘Pink Charmer’

This flowering plant also goes by the common names of ‘wood anemone’ and ‘Balkan anemone.’ It is a perennial plant native to southeastern Europe that grows from underground tubers. It is cultivated for its pretty fern-like foliage and the daisy-like flowers that bloom in abundance in early spring, bringing color to the garden when little else is blooming. The plant's ability to flower to such a huge extent gives the look of a flowering carpet.

The flowers come in various colors, including pink, purple, red, yellow, and white. They have smooth, satin-like petals and central yellow discs. They work well in beds and borders or planted under the partial shade of trees or taller shrubs. They thrive in both full sun and partial shade and should be grown in soil that is kept consistently moist.


7. Persian Violet

Persian Violet

 

Scientific Name: Cyclamen coum

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Mature Size: Up to 6 inches tall

Light: Partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘Maurice Dryden’ Persian Violet - Cyclamen coum ‘Maurice Dryden’, ‘Tilebarn Elizabeth’ Persian Violet - Cyclamen coum ‘Tilebarn Elizabeth’

Persian violets are perennial plants that grow from tubers. They are also commonly known as ‘eastern sowbread,’ or simply ‘cyclamen.’ These plants are native to regions that lie around the Black Sea. They bloom early in spring, producing interesting and delicate-looking flowers, which are small but showy. The flowers typically come in shades of vibrant pinks and purples. The foliage of the plant is also attractive; each leaf is heart-shaped with a dark green-blue base color with cream-silver colored variegation in random splatters.

This plant is valued as a flowering type of ground cover, which will self-seed and naturalize easily. The foliage grows and spreads throughout winter, while the flowers will bloom for several weeks in late winter and early spring. By mid to late spring, both the foliage and flowers will have died back. This is a low maintenance plant, which does not need to be deadheaded. It works well in planters, beds and borders, and along footpaths. Persian violets thrive in partial shade, so they can also be planted under the light canopy of deciduous trees, which will provide dappled shade.


8. Freesia

 Freesia

 

Scientific Name: Freesia sp.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-10

Mature Size: Up to 2 feet tall

Light: Full sun

Water: Maintain moist soil

Soil: Well-draining

Cultivars and Varieties: Freesia Double Blue, Freesia Single Yellow, Freesia Double Pink

Freesias are perennial plants that grow from conical shaped corms, similar to bulbs. They are native to Africa and are predominantly found around the Cape Provinces in South Africa. They are commonly cultivated for their stunning funnel-shaped flowers, which bloom throughout spring. Each corm will produce a cluster of grass-like foliage that surrounds a single stem. The stem will then branch out at the top and produce between five and ten individual flowers.

The flowers come in a wide range of colors, including pink, blue, purple, red, yellow, and orange. These are low maintenance plants that thrive in full sun and partial shade and need their soil to be kept moist continuously. The stems of the flowers may need staking to prevent them from drooping under the weight of the blooms. Freesias are popular cut flowers and have an impressively long life once cut of around three weeks.


9. Crown Imperial

Crown Imperial

 

Scientific Name: Fritillaria imperialis

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-8

Mature Size: Up to 4 feet tall

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, sandy

Cultivars and Varieties: ‘Maxima Lutea’ Crown Imperial - Fritillaria imperialis ‘Maxima Lutea’, ‘Beethoven’ Crown Imperial - Fritillaria imperialis ‘Beethoven’, ‘Aurora’ Crown Imperial - Fritillaria imperialis ‘Aurora’

This flowering plant belongs to the lily family and is native to Asia. It is widely cultivated for its showy blooms and has become naturalized in some parts of Europe and North America, including Washington State. Plants grow from bulbs and will come back year on year in good conditions.

The plants bloom in mid to late spring, producing tall upright stems with pendulous bell-shaped flowers. The stem will also produce a crown of foliage above the flowers, giving the plant an unusual and quirky look. These are easy-care plants, but they must be grown in very well-draining soil, and they can succumb to root rot very quickly. Amend poorly draining soil with sand.


10. Spring Snowflake

Spring Snowflake

 

Scientific Name: Leucojum vernum

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9

Mature Size: Up to 10 inches

Light: Full sun to partial shade

Water: Average to high moisture needs

Soil: Well-draining, organic

This is a perennial flowering plant that grows from bulbs. It is native to Europe but has naturalized in some parts of North America, including Florida and Georgia. It blooms in early spring, producing delicate-looking white flowers that are dotted with green spots. The flowers are pendulous and look as though they are nodding. Flowers have a slight fragrance and rise above lance-like foliage. The plant grows easily but performs best in moist to wet soils, such as boggy soil around the edge of ponds or streams.

 

10 Spring Flowers That Are Easy to Grow

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